Live Blood Analysis

In Live Blood-Cell Analysis (LBA) a high-power microscope is used to analyze a drop of blood as a screening tool.  In this test a drop of blood is placed on a glass slide, put under a dark field microscope, then projected on a video monitor to be examined.
The sample is examined for toxicities, indications of allergies, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, immune system health and specific organ function.
Nutritional microscopy is now an alternative examination routinely practiced by holistic medical osteopathic and chiropractic practitioners as well as naturopaths and other healthcare professionals.  It offers an instructive view of the biological terrain.
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Why Blood?

Our blood is the vital fluid of life. Its condition is of paramount importance to the state of our health. Blood is responsible for transporting and delivering oxygen and nutrients to every cell in the body, and for picking up carbon dioxide and waste products for delivery to the organs of elimination. It also carries the immune system’s white blood cells that are responsible for keeping us free of the pathogens that make us ill.

What is Live Blood Cell and Dry Blood Cell analysis?

Viewing live blood under a microscope is probably as old as the microscope itself. But it was the work of European scientists Dr Antoine Bechamp and Dr Gunther Enderlein in the mid-19th and early 20th centuries that would advance the use of the microscope, challenge the medical establishment of the day and propose new ways of interpreting what was being viewed in blood. Other microscopists included noted physiologist Dr Claude Bernard, who coined the term “internal milieu”, Germ Theory advocate Louis Pasteur, Californian Dr. Virginia Livingston Wheeler and Canadian scientist Gaston Naessens. (Dr Robert O Young PhD D.Sc: 2001: Sick and Tired)

What can be seen through Live Blood Cell analysis?

In Live Blood-Cell Analysis (LBA) a high-power microscope is used to analyze a drop of living blood as a diagnostic tool.  In this test a drop of blood is placed on a glass slide, put under a dark field microscope, then projected on a video monitor to be examined.  Blood is examined for toxicities, indications of allergies, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, immune system etc.

Candida Blood          Adrenal Fatigue          Bacteria          Bowel Toxicity

What is Dry Blood Analysis?

Dried Blood Cell Analysis is a simple way of assessing general health conditions. It can show a possible heavy metal toxicity, foreign protein, lung, liver, kidney stress, and more

History of Dry Cell Analysis

In the 1920s, European medical practitioners added another twist to unconventional microscopy when they began looking at dried blood samples, later called the Oxidative Stress Test. A glass microscope slide is dabbed onto a bead of blood on the finger in sequence several times, resulting in a slide with eight individual drops of blood pressed upon the slide and allowed to air dry.

The resulting patterns seen in the dry blood under the bright field format reveal a characteristic ‘footprint’ which can be seen in similar cases and, thus, are predictive of certain generalized pathologies. For instance, cases of advanced degenerative disease show very poor clotting and minimal fibrin formation with many white ‘puddles’ disseminated throughout the sample. In contrast, a healthy control subject’s blood shows a tight, fibrin-rich clotting pattern with no white puddles.

Dried Blood Cell Analysis is a simple way of assessing general health conditions. It can show a possible systemic candida overgrowth, inflammation, acidity, bowel stress, adrenal stress, hormonal imbalance, heavy metal toxicity, foreign protein, lung, liver, kidney stress, and more.

In the 1930s, the head of surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital, Dr H L Bowlen MD, introduced the dry blood test to America. Dr Bowlen learned the dry test from President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s physicians, Drs Heitlan and LaGarde. In the 1970s, one of Heitlan-LaGarde’s students, Dr Robert Bradford of the American Biologics Hospital in Mexico, began teaching other practitioners how to perform this test. So there is now over 70 years of dry blood testing data by hundreds of healthcare practitioners worldwide.

Disclaimer: All the information presented is for educational purposes only. None of the information herein has been reviewed tested or approved by the FDA and is not intended to, diagnose, treat or prevent any disease.